“That’s why I’m saved…”

Let Yourself Go (2006)

Let Yourself Go (2006)

I gave the 2006 FTD release Let Yourself Go! a spin for the first time in quite awhile last weekend.

Due to its primary focus on segments for the production number medleys, it’s probably the ’68 special album I play the least – other than two or three of the rehearsal tracks.

On this listen, however, two of the non-rehearsal tracks demanded my attention.

Recorded for use in the gospel medley, “Saved” features as an alternate take here.

Unlike many of the other medley segments on this release, “Saved” works as a stand-alone track. In fact, it’s really cool finally to have “Saved” by itself!

Elvis’ exuberance on this version is so contagious that I prefer it far and above the comparatively subdued master take used in the medley. On the alternate, he even throws in a “whooh!” at one point, unable to contain himself. That’s what makes the comeback era so special, hearing such pure joy return to Elvis’ music.

Incidentally, if you have never heard LaVern Baker’s original 1959 version of “Saved,” do yourself a favor and find it somewhere. She does an incredible job on the song.

Anyway, I don’t remember the alternate vocal track of “Memories” jumping out at me when I first played Let Yourself Go! way back when. For some reason, this time, it really stood out. The difference between it and the master was not nearly as striking as it was for “Saved,” but the song is just beautiful.

Hearing a slightly different inflection on a few lines of a song I’ve played so often makes it feel new again. The sound quality on both of these tracks is superb.

I love re-discovering songs that have been in my collection for awhile. I wonder what will turn up next?

2 thoughts on ““That’s why I’m saved…”

  1. Great post, Ty! I too love to rediscover songs, as well as whole albums. Sometimes I listen so much to outtakes that I almost forget how the masters sound. (So when returning to them, they almost feel “new” too.)

    Incidentially, the first take of “Saved” was released on the FTD album Easter Special (2001), and that one is even more rough than the one on Let Yourself Go! (take 4). Great versions, both of them!

    Like

Comments are closed.